MARIUS BOSC


African Violets

Oil on Canvas

22” x 28”

Retail Value: $3,000

Minimum Bid: $1,050

Signed

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The two strongest influences on Marius Bosc’s paintings are the colors and light of the Bay Area and the French culture that his grandmothers transmitted to him. In his work he expresses the sensations he experiences in his daily life. Whether it is the female or male figure, flowers in a vase bathed in light and color, or the Northern California landscape, his encounters with the outer world emerge on the canvas, starting from an inner experience. This always involves an interaction of color, space and movement. Marius also worked as a graphic designer for various publications like the New York Times. Opera News, and Esquire Magazine. Deciding to pursue his first passion, painting, he returned to San Francisco in 1970. People have often associated Marius’ figurative works with the Bay Area figurative painters, including Richard Diebenkorn and Nathan Olivera. Although he paints figurative works like these artists, his style is his own.

In 2018, Marius participated in a group show titled “Late Bloom” at the Bryant Street Gallery in Palo Alto, California. The show consisted of six artists’ interpretation of the flower as subject. Also in 2018 Desta Gallery presented his flower paintings and figurative works in a solo exhibit.  

In 2019, Marius had a solo exhibit for the Serenity Project at Mount Zion, UCSF’Women’s Health Center located at 2356 Sutter Street, San Francisco. The exhibit consisted of landscape paintings that explore the light, color and space of the Bay Area and Northern California. Many of the paintings in the show were of Marin Headlands – hills and sky painted from San Francisco side of the Bay.   

Marius Bosc’s paintings have been represented by the following galleries: Gumps Gallery (the old Gumps), Ira Wolk Gallery in St. Helena,  Dolby ChadwickGallery in San Francisco, Desta  Gallery in San Anselmo. He is currently represented  by The  Bryant Street Gallery in Palo Alto.

 

 

© UCSF Alliance Health Project