GRETA & MANU SCHNETZLER


Greta-&-Manu-Schnetzler-2016-web

schnetzler.com

Honey I’m Home

Print on metal  

Edition: 2/15

24″ x 36″

Signature: on the back

Retail Value: $750

Minimum Bid: $250

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Greta and Manu Schnetzler photograph at night because they are struck by the transformative power of night lighting—moonlight or artificial—to create beauty and mystery in gritty urban settings. Text often finds its way into their work as a substitute for human presence and sometimes, as a commentary on the scene. Greta and Manu seek to capture a moment that anticipates what is about to happen or what may have just happened in order to evoke a narrative. Great and Manu are attracted to what has been left behind to be destroyed, to decay, or just to wait to be reanimated by human presence. After seeing their urban landscape transform so quickly. Greta and Manu often feel a sense of urgency to photograph the scenes they are drawn to before it is too late.

Greta and Manu are long-time residents of Potrero Hill where they have exhibited their work with other “Hill” artists in the annual group exhibit and local venues. They have also exhibited in solo and group exhibitions, including the annual Open Studios-SF exhibit, frequently with Studio Nocturne. Their work is in private and corporate collections in the United States and Europe. They are active in the community and frequently donate prints and photographic services to benefit local nonprofit organizations. They enjoy looking for inspiration together.

Michael Yochum of SF Art News, wrote in 2012, “For photographers, Manu and Greta Schnetzler the night is an adventure. Not all places are equally transformed by the night. It takes night eyes to see the potential for magic and mystery in a place that seems quite mundane in the daytime. Photography is uniquely qualified as an art form to capture the emotion that the qualities of night evoke. We always feel that there is something unseen just outside of our perception; and, the camera actually captures a piece of that.”

© UCSF Alliance Health Project